We Repair Weber County Sprinkers!
Ogden, UT
Monday - Saturday: 7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
13 Jul 2020

3 Reasons to Use Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) Year-Round

Let’s face the facts here. Most companies that you hire to work on your home, whether they be general contractors, landscapers, or someplace in between, will care about you or the project they’re working on for you in the allotted time they work. If it’s a 9-5 job, the guarantee is that they’ll care for you or your project from 9-5. One call to Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) at (801) 784-0587 will have you seeing that we don’t just care for you or the project for a day or for a week. We’re here for you in the long-run.

Beyond the experiences of other companies, who may be good for a few days out of the year, with Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT), we’re here for you year-round. If your project was during the Summer, we’ll be here for you in the Spring, Fall, and Winter too. At Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT), we’re a full-service sprinkler company that has your best interest in mind, all the time. We’re here to offer quality parts, service, and products all at an affordable price. Unlike other companies, we treat you like family, simply because that’s the way you deserve to be treated.

Perhaps you still need more reason to use our services? That is understandable, and we’re here to help you every step of the way! Click here to watch a video explaining our quality sprinkler installation services, call us at (801) 784-0587, or keep reading to find 3 reasons why you need Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT)!

Reason #1: Our Location Can’t Be BeatOgden UT Sprinkler Repair

Whereas other companies have an office you have to visit, or a small service area to cover and maneuver through, Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) is simple and expansive! One call at (801) 784-0587 is all it takes to start scheduling an appointment for our sprinkler services, and we have a wide service area that covers the majority of Weber County! Don’t waste your time driving to offices or calling numbers that won’t get back to you! Call Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) today at (801) 784-0587 today to get serviced in the following locations:

If the location you need isn’t listed above, try our other Sprinkler Master Repair Franchise locations that are nearby, including Utah County, Davis County, West Jordan, or Salt Lake City. Also, visit our alternate website here to learn more about our easy scheduling process around Weber County, UT!

Sprinkler Install South Ogden, UTReason #2: Quality Parts, Quality Products & Quality Service

As stated above and before, a leading principle behind Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) is quality. We believe that quality parts, products, and service is essential to the experience of working with another company, and beyond that, we also believe that you deserve fairness when it comes to pricing. We only use the best products and parts in the business but at a fraction of the price of other companies. Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) proudly uses brands such as Hunter, Toro, Rainbird, and Orbit sprinkler heads, valves, timers, and more.

Beyond our quality parts and products, we stand by our quality services. One thing that sets Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) apart from other sprinkler companies is that we can be called on year-round, rain, snow, or shine for any sprinkler-related or landscaping need. We specialize in:

Call Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) today to ask about our other exceptional services, and how we can serve you year-round, at (801) 784-0578!

Reason #3: Reviews Speak Louder Than Words

Positive reviews are the lifeblood of any successful business. At Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT), we’re humbled and honored to have such high reviews across Facebook and Google, to name a few. As can be seen with the images below, we hold a 4.8 out of 5-star’ rating on both platforms with 23 reviews on Facebook and 64 from Google. We work hard on every job to ensure that your experience is never unsatisfactory. With Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT), the customer is always right. We won’t be satisfied until you’re satisfied with what’s been done to improve the look, quality, and feel of your lawn or garden.

Sprinkler Master Weber Positive ReviewSprinkler Master Weber County Sweet Reviews

Conclusion

When it comes to a company that’s got your back through thick and thin, Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) is a company you can trust and count on time and time again. Don’t settle for someplace that doesn’t have your needs and wants as a top priority. Call Sprinkler Master Repair (Weber County, UT) today at (801) 784-0578! We install the best and repair the rest around Weber County and more!

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29 Apr 2020

Understanding Sprinkler Timers with Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT)

At Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT) we’re here to help you understand the in’s and out’s of your sprinkler system. While a sprinkler timer doesn’t put water on your lawn, it is crucial to know how it works to get the most out of your automatic sprinkler system. If you’d like more face to face help and interaction, you can always give us a call at (801) 784-0587. Here is what you need to know about Sprinkler Timers:

BASIC FUNCTIONS

The sprinkler timer is the brain of the sprinkler system. It tells the valves when to turn on and off, and gives the user more control at the interface. Every sprinkler timer has a slightly different interface, with some being easier to use than others. But, the best way to understand all of them is to break down what they do. All sprinkler timers have the same 3 essential functions.

How To Program All Sprinkler Timers

These are the 3 settings and functions you’ll need to review on your timer to ensure it’ll water at proper times and put out the right amount of water for each zone. After checking that the date and time are correct, you’ll need to review the 3 functions on every timer to make sure they are programmed correctly.

  1. What days to water: This automates the system to water only on days you select

  2. What time of day to water: You should try and have your sprinkler turn on when it’s just before sunrise to prevent water from evaporating. Watering early morning or early evening is most effective to get the water to soak deep in the soil.

  3. And how long to water each zone: This will allow the sprinklers to only water as long as you tell it to before automatically shutting it off.

Check out this video for more information! At Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT) we can help you in setting or fixing a faulty sprinkler timer. One call is all it would take to have the problem solved in no time, at (801) 784-0587.

Common Problems With Sprinkler Timer FunctionsSprinkler Timer Repair Ogden

1. No Power: Check if the timer is properly plugged in and getting power. Usually, there is no power going to the outlet, and a breaker may be tripped.

2. Too Many Start Times: The start time is when the sprinkler will start and run through every valve on the whole system. Usually there is only one start time. If you have 2 start times, say one at 9 pm and another at 4 am, it would start and run through the entire sprinkler system at 9 pm, then start again at 4 am. Unless you have problems with water runoff you should only have 1 start time, at early evening or early morning.

3. Programs: Different programs can also be confusing. These are usually labeled a and b, or abc and d. These allow different saved presets of settings to quickly be selected. For ease of use, only use the first program.

4. Wiring Problems: Wiring that breaks or shorts out while connecting with other wires can mess up the timer and cause it to not function and display an error or fault warning. Check in the timer and the valve box that none of the wires are touching. If not, you’ll have to use a multi-meter to figure out where the problem is. When a broken wire is present, the best option is to reconnect the timer and the valve to a different spare wire in the bundle.

If there is a problem with one of the zones, or with wiring, timers have a setting usually labelled “manual” that will allow you to manually activate and deactivate valves.

When none of these solutions fix the timer, simply replace the timer. We can help you install or try to fix your timer with ease at Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT). Call us at (801) 784-0587 to schedule an appointment today!

Tips and Tricks

It’s generally best to only have a single start time on the “timers setting.”

One solenoid wire must be connected to the zone wire, while the other is connected to the common wire. It doesn’t matter which goes to which, as long as the zone wire and common wire don’t directly touch each other.

Conclusion

Sprinkler timers can be very intimidating, but they all share the same functions and once you break them down, they’re quite simple. At Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT) we won’t only fix the problem, but we’ll help show you how to fix it for yourself. Our biggest concern is you, the customer. We install the best and repair the rest at Sprinkler Master Repair (Ogden, UT). Call us today at (801) 784-0587 to see how we can help you with sprinkler timers and more!

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09 Aug 2018

Sprinkler Repair in Ogden, Utah!

Sprinkler Master (Ogden, Utah) (801) 784-0587

Sprinkler system broken? Sprinkler Master Repair can help! As experts in sprinkler repair, there is no lawn irrigation system problem we can’t solve. Don’t let a broken sprinkler system ruin your beautiful lawn. Give us a call!

Some of our services include: Repairing sprinkler heads, installing a valve box, raising heads in flower beds, replacing solenoid valves, and installing a rain or moisture sensor.

Need sprinkler help in Ogden, Utah? Contact us today at (801) 784-0587

24 Aug 2016
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How To Save On The Water Bill By Saving Water!

A lawn sprinkler system makes life much easier and saves us time. A sprinkler system cuts back on the use of water by watering more effectively. However, a broken sprinkler system can waste over 4’000 gallons of water a month. Most sprinkler problems go unnoticed because they run at night and go unseen. Common problems with a lawn sprinkler system is that they are not rising above the grass (not popping up all the way) as well as broken tops and broken pipes below the ground. Sprinklers that do not cover correctly wastewater and can causing lasting damage. Call Sprinkler Master Repair today!

Common problems of sprinklers wasting water:

  • Broken Sprinkler Head
  • Broken or cracked sprinkler pipes
  • Over watering from timer
  • Sunken tilted sprinklers heads
  • Wrong spray pattern
  • Mixed sprinkler heads
  • Sprinkler needs minor adjustment
  • Sprinkler valve or zone won’t turn off

Schedule a Free Water Check here with the state

www.slowtheflow.org/index.php/forms/free-water-check
www.cwel.usu.edu/watercheck

For sprinkler repair or winterization click below.

Locations

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www.sprinklermaster.repair

16 Aug 2016

10 Ways a Great Lawn Will Make Life Better!

Top Advantages of a Beautiful Lawn

Happy Family Playing in lawn Sprinkler Master Repair
A beautiful family having a great time on their luscious green lawn
A beautiful, lush, dense lawn has many great advantages. A home with an inviting lawn will welcome you and all of your guests. Here are a few advantages of a well maintained lawn.
Grass Cools Down Your Property
When the heat is on in the summer, grass keeps you cool. Front lawns of just 8 average houses have the same cooling effect as about 70 tons of air conditioning, while the average home-size central air unit has only a 3 – 4 ton capacity. On top of that grass acts as a noise reducer as it effectively absorbs and deflects sound. When combining a beautiful lush lawn with trees, shrubs and other landscaping a lawn can significantly reduce hard unwanted noise.
Enhances the Whole Neighborhood
Lawns can contribute to your sense of well-being. Most people say that the best place to relax is in their own backyard. A green, attractive landscape design goes much further than just relaxation and recreation. For example when the city installs landscaping and grass parks to enhance the area, people start taking pride in their surroundings and raise the bar of their own property maintenance. As well as, when I have a neighbor with a well-kept lawn, it encourages the rest of the neighbors to do a better job and in return the whole neighborhood benefits.
Easier to Sell Your Home
An attractive landscape can make or break a home sale. Landscaping can add tens of thousands of dollars to the value of your property. In fact, it is one of the few home improvements you can make that not only adds value immediately, but also increases in value as the years go by; while interior decor and design concepts regularly go out of style and mechanical systems wear out, plants grow fuller and more robust as the years go by. The home’s value is added at an advantage ranged from 5.5 percent to 12.7 percent. That translates into an extra $16,500 to $38,100 in value on a $300,000 home. A beautiful landscape design and healthy lawn is a good indication that they’ve taken care of the inside of the house as well and that the home is worth a premium price.
Grass Is A Pollution Fighter!
In one year the blades and roots of grass in an acre of healthy grass absorbs hundreds of pounds of pollutants from the air and rainfall. Among them are sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, hydrogen, fluoride, nitrates and other gases blamed for acid rain and the greenhouse effect.
Grass Produces Oxygen
Grass plants remove co2 from the air and produce o2 in return. Just 625 square feet of grass supplies all the oxygen a person needs for one day. A 5000 square foot lawn produces enough oxygen for 8 people each day. In comparison, it takes two 100-foot trees to provide the same amount of oxygen for 8 people.
Grass Saves Soil!
A green lush lawn stabilizes the soil against water and wind. Lawns prevent runoff and erosion of our valuable topsoil, keeping additional phosphorus from entering our streams and rivers. A healthy lawn also traps much of the estimated 12 million tons of dust and dirt released into the US atmosphere annually.
Grass Has Better Rain Absorption
Healthy, dense lawns absorb rainfall 6 times more effectively than a wheat field, four times better than a hay field, and prevent runoff and erosion of our precious topsoil, keeping additional phosphorus from entering our streams and rivers. A healthy lawn also traps much of the estimated 12 million tons of dust and dirt released into the US atmosphere annually.
Grass is Mother Nature’s Carpet
Nature surrounds us, make yours stunning! Grass is used for recreation from family picnics to soccer to football to any other sport played on grass, grass is essential. It acts as a pad to reduce injuries that might have happened. A dense lawn is a far safer playground and playing field than nearly any other surface.
Hospitalized Patients Have A Faster Recovery
When the patient’s room viewed a beautiful landscaped area compared to patients with non-landscaped views a faster recovery has been observed in hospitals.
Grass Helps Fight Wildfires
With the weather heating up, wildfires are more prone to spreading. Help protect yourself with a lush green lawn. Grass is known to have a low fuel value which can actually help act as a buffer around your property in case of fire hazards.

Need a sprinkler repair? Find a location near you!

20 Jul 2016

How To Fix Lawn Dry Spots

Fix Dry Spots with the help of Sprinkler Master Repair
Don’t put up with dry spots from your sprinkler system. Call Sprinkler Master today!

Dry patches in your lawn are stressful for both you and your lawn. They can be frustrating to deal with. Have you ever wondered how to fix the dead spots? The good news is that most lawns can make a full recovery with the proper care. The most common problem for dried out grass is due to inadequate water, fertilizer burn or dog urine. It is important to determine what caused the damage to your lawn. When your grass needs water it may dry out in irregular patches, or the drying may spread over the entire lawn. Dry grass caused by dog urine typically occurs in small patches, while fertilizer burn can occur over a large area.

First feel the soil in the dry spot midday and check if it feels dry. Turn on your lawn sprinkler system and watch to see if you have any broken sprinklers or if the dry areas are being covered. If you need a sprinkler repair this is where we shine – Sprinkler Master can fix any sprinkler problem. We would be happy to come out and take a look at your sprinkler system. Just give a call at one of our many locations. Not sure if you have a leak or broken sprinkler? Sprinkler Master can also help come up with a solution. Call us today; we will come out and run through your sprinkler system and do a thorough inspection to find the problem causing dry spots.

sprinkler Sprinkler Master Repair LLC
Broken sprinklers are the biggest waste of water in the U.S. and main cause of dry spots

Broken Sprinkler System

Most of the time, lawn sprinklers are broken and you don’t see them because it runs at night. Broken sprinklers, according to the USU Extension Office, are the biggest waste of water in the U.S. and main cause of dry spots.

Runtime

To find out if your sprinklers are set for the proper runtime, you can put an empty tuna can or rain gauge and leave it on the dry spot and let it collect water to see if the spot is getting enough water. It should contain ¾ of an inch in the tuna can with one cycle.

How To Water With A Sprinkler System

When watering your lawn the goal is to get the water deep in the soil. The deeper you get the water into the soil the hardier and healthier your lawn will become. To achieve deep watering, set your timer for about three days per week and run your zones (stations) for a longer period of time. You may have to water longer per zone depending on the position of the sun, the soil type, and the sprinkler type.

When to Water

DO NOT WATER AT WHEN THE SUN IS AT ITS HIGHEST POINT! Watering at the heat of the day can burn your lawn by creating a magnifying glass effect with the water drops, also evaporation will become very high. The best time to set you timer is at night or early morning such as 4:00 am.

Lawn problem? Here is a list to help you determine what actions should be taken.

lawn and flowers
Keep your lawn looking healthy and green with the help of Sprinkler Master Repair!

Problem: Brown dry spots, not enough water
Solution: Check your sprinkler system. Use tools to measure water output. Set water timer and times accordingly to water correctly.

Problem: Brown dry spots. Patches of lawn are dried out. High traffic areas are dried out.
Solution: When there are high traffic areas on the lawn the soil can become compacted. Aerate the lawn annually to improve the overall health of your grass. The water will be able to penetrate deeper, resulting in stronger roots and beautiful lush green grass.

Problem: Small dry spots left from dog’s urine.
Solution: During high temperatures of 90 degrees and above, pet urine can kill the roots and burn the grass. Dog urine is high in nitrogen and will kill the grass roots. Spraying over the urine with a watering hose minutes after your dog urinates will help dilute the urine. Train your pet to urinate in a designated space away from the main lawn. Planting new seed will help fill in the spots where the roots have completely died out.

Problem: Fertilizer burns, yellow dry stripes or patches of dead grass.
Solution: Use a garden hose and sprinkler to soak the burned area. Allow the water to saturate and carry away the excess fertilizer. Rake up and throw away dead grass and soil. Next add a fresh top soil to the area. Plant new grass in the bare areas, and then water sufficiently.

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We can fix any sprinkler problem!

Click to find location nearest you

07 Mar 2016

Sprinkler Repair Tips

Links to various sprinkler repair articles:

Sprinkler heads not working? Solution 1: Replace the heads

Broken sprinkler heads are easy to identify. Simply look for cracked or broken plastic casing on the heads, heads that don’t pop up, or water that sprays wildly or not at all. It’s common to find the top of the head completely broken off. This typically happens to heads that are set too high and are run over by vehicles or hit by lawn mowers.

Replacing the head is one of the simplest fixes. Replacement heads are available at home centers and online. Be sure to buy the same type of head that you’re replacing.

To change a broken head, turn off the system and dig a 2-ft.-diameter hole around the head. Using a square shovel, slice the sod into easy-to-remove pieces. Set the sod on a tarp so you can set it back into place at the end of the job.

Dig down to the “riser” (the vertical pipe that branches off the main line) which is connected to the sprinkler head. Dig with a light touch to avoid damaging the plastic water line, which is 8 to 12 in. underground.

Turn the head counterclockwise to remove it from the riser. While the head is off, take care not to spill dirt into the riser. Sprinkler heads are installed only hand-tight, but after being in the ground for several years, they may require the use of wrenches to unscrew. If the head doesn’t turn easily, hold the riser with slip joint pliers to keep it from twisting loose from the fittings below.

Attach the new sprinkler head by placing it on the riser and turning it hand-tight (photo). Don’t use Teflon tape or joint compound on the riser threads. Sprinkler heads are factory tested to make sure they work. As a result, they’re often packaged still wet, so don’t be surprised to see water in a new head.

Before filling in the hole and replacing the sod, set the desired sprinkler pattern (see “Reset the Spray Pattern,” below).

Caution: Before you start digging to access the underground water lines, electrical wires or spray heads, dial 811 to have your underground utility lines identified and marked.

Sprinkler heads not working? Solution 2: Clean and reset heads

Dirt sometimes gets inside sprinkler heads, causing them to clog up. Clogged heads may rise but fail to spray, not lower after watering, or produce an erratic spray pattern.

To clean the head, dig it out and remove it from the Riser (Photo above). Take the head apart by holding the bottom of the canister and turning the top of the head counterclockwise. Once it’s unscrewed, lift it out of the canister (Photo 1).

Remove the plastic screen basket, which serves as a filter, at the base of the head. If you can’t pop the basket out with your fingers, pry it out with a flat-head screwdriver or pull it free with a pliers. Rinse the basket in a bucket of clean water, washing out the debris (Photo 2). Clean the rest of the sprinkler head by rinsing it with water. Replace the head on the riser. If it still doesn’t work, replace it with a new head. Note: In areas of the country that experience freezing temperatures, polyethylene (poly) pipe is used for the irrigation water lines. PVC pipe is used in areas that don’t freeze.

Reset the spray pattern

When putting on a new sprinkler head or using the same head after cleaning, you may need to adjust it to water a specific area. Adjustment methods vary. You can adjust some head types by turning a slot at the top with a screwdriver. Others require a special key that you insert into the head and turn (Photo 3). Some heads also allow you to adjust the spray pattern by turning a tiny screw located next to the nozzle.

Adjust the heads before installing them, then fine-tune them once they’re in place with the sprinkler running. First, turn the top clockwise until it stops. That nozzle location is the starting point (the head will turn counterclockwise from there). Adjust the head to set the watering rotation anywhere from 40 degrees to 360 degrees counterclockwise from the starting point. Set the head in the canister. Standing behind the head, align the nozzle with the right edge of the area you want to water, such as along a driveway. Tighten the head in the canister. Carefully backfill the hole and replace the sod.

Turn on the sprinklers at the controller. Allow the head to make a few rotations, then make additional adjustments while the system is running.

Low water pressure? Solution 1: Turn on valves at backflow device

Low water pressure will result in the sprinkler heads barely shooting water. In extreme cases, many of the heads won’t even pop up. Start with the easiest solution. Make sure the valves at the backflow device are fully open. The backflow device is located above ground, with the valve at least 12 in. above the highest sprinkler head in the yard. Most backflow devices have a valve on the horizontal and vertical pipes. Turn the valves to their open positions as shown. The valve is open when the handle is parallel with the pipe.

Low water pressure? Solution 2: Find and repair leaks

Then check for leaks in the water line. Look for a series of sprinkler heads that aren’t watering properly. The water line problem is always located between the last working head and the first nonworking head.

Look for signs of leaking water, such as water bubbling up from the soil when the sprinklers are running, a depression in the ground, or a very wet area. If you find running water, follow the water to the highest point to find the source.

Once you locate the approximate leak site, dig straight down to the water line. Then enlarge the hole along the line, following the flow of the leaking water until you find the break or crack. Before making the repair, make sure the system is turned off at the controller.

Use a slip coupling to repair the leak. This special coupling contracts to make insertion easy. Find these couplings and other repair parts at irrigation supply stores.

To fix the leak, use a hacksaw to cut out a 4-in. section of line at the leak. Place a clamp on one of the line ends, insert the coupling, then tighten the clamp.

Place a clamp on the second pipe end, expand the coupling while inserting the nipple into the pipe, then tighten the clamp. Backfill the hole with dirt and replace the sod.

Low water pressure? Solution 3: Repair crushed pipes

If you can’t locate a leak, the water line may be crushed or obstructed. Sometimes, roots wrap around the line and squeeze it closed over the course of several years (photo 1). Or vehicles may have compressed the soil and collapsed the line. These problems are harder to find and often require a lot of digging. Again, look for the problem after the last working head. Dig along the water line until you find the damaged section. If the line runs near a tree, start your digging there.

Once you locate the damaged section, cut it out with a hacksaw. If the line was damaged by tree roots, reroute the line by digging a new trench away from the tree.

Cut a new section of pipe to replace the damaged one. Then replace the section of pipe, connecting it at each end with regular couplings and band clamps (photo 2).

Zone not working? Solution 1: Check for voltage to the bad zone

Your watering system is divided into a series of zones. Each zone has an electrically activated valve that controls the heads for a designated area.

Generally, if you have a zone that’s not turning on, you have an electrical problem. To solve the problem, make sure the zone wires are firmly attached to the terminals in the controller, the transformer is plugged in, and the circuit breaker at the main panel is on.

Next, test for voltage to the non working zone, using a multimeter (at home centers and hardware stores). Turn on the nonworking zone at the controller. Turn the multimeter dial to voltage and place one lead on the common terminal (marked “c” or “com”). Place the other lead on the terminal of the zone that’s not working (photo left). It doesn’t matter which lead goes to which terminal.

Refer to your owner’s manual to see whether the voltage reading falls within the required range (usually 24 to 28 volts). If it doesn’t, the controller needs to be replaced. (If you don’t get any voltage reading, see “Check Fuse and Transformer,” below.)

Fortunately, controllers rarely go bad unless struck by lightning. New ones start at $175 and can cost upward of $400. Replace a damaged controller with the same brand and model as you currently have. To replace it, label each wire that’s connected to the controller with a piece of tape. Unhook the wires, then attach them to the new controller in the same sequence.

Zone not working? Solution 2: Check fuse and transformer

If no zones will turn on, first turn the controller to the manual setting to see if the system will run. If it turns on manually, the controller is good but the rain sensor may be stopping the automatic programmed watering, which is what it’s designed to do.

Rain sensors conserve water by preventing the system from running when the ground is already saturated and doesn’t need additional watering. Some states require rain sensors on all new systems. (Your rain sensor is bad if the system runs when the ground is already wet.)

If the system doesn’t run in the manual position, check the controller for power. If it has a fuse, make sure it’s not blown. Or, if it has a circuit breaker reset button, press the button, then try the system again. If the system is plugged into a GFCI receptacle, press the GFCI reset button.

If it still doesn’t turn on, make sure the outlet that the power transformer is plugged into is working by plugging in a power tool. If it’s working, plug the transformer back in, turn the system off and test the transformer for voltage. Using a multimeter, place a lead on each of the two transformer terminals. It doesn’t matter which lead goes to which terminal.

The transformer terminals are marked “24 vac.” A 24-voltage transformer should normally test between 24 and 28 volts. If the voltage falls below the manufacturer’s range, replace the transformer. Simply unscrew the terminals that hold the two transformer wires in the controller and remove the transformer (photo). Insert the wires on the new transformer through the designated opening in the controller. Attach the wires to the controller terminals marked “24 vac” by placing the wire ends under the screws, then tightening them.

Zone not working? Solution 3: Replace defective valve

If the controller, fuse and transformer check out OK, test the resistance “ohms” between the common terminal and the non working zone. Turn off the system, turn the multimeter to test for ohms (the omega symbol), and place the leads on the common terminal and zone terminal, just as you did to test for voltage.

Compare the ohms reading with the range listed in your owner’s manual (usually 20 to 60 ohms). If the ohms fall below the required amount, the switch (solenoid) that operates the control valve for that zone is defective and needs to be replaced. The defective solenoid will be connected to the same color wire as the zone wire at the controller. (If the reading is too high, see “Repair Damaged Wires” below.)

Control valves are typically grouped with three to six valves in one box (Photo 1). The boxes are located in the ground with a cover that simply lifts off. They can be located anywhere in the yard but are usually close to the main water supply.

Although valves themselves rarely need to be replaced, solenoids do occasionally fail. Replacing them is quick and easy. Be sure the controller is in the off position (you don’t need to shut off the power) and the water valves on the backflow device are turned off. Inside the control valve box, remove the wire connectors and disconnect the two wires on the defective solenoid from the common and field wires. Turn the solenoid counterclockwise to unscrew it from the valve (Photo 1). Water will slowly seep out of the valve opening, even with the water turned off.

Place a new solenoid in the valve and turn it until it’s finger-tight. Twist the ends of the new solenoid wires onto the same common and field wires that the old solenoid was attached to (Photo 2). It doesn’t matter which solenoid wire goes to the common and which one goes to the field wire. Twist a new waterproof wire connector over each connection (Photo 2). To make waterproof connections, use a silicone-filled “direct bury” connector (Photo 2A), available at home centers.

Repair damaged wires If the ohms reading between the common terminal and non working zone terminal is too high (it’s sometimes an infinity reading), the problem is a severed or bad wire to the control valve. If only one zone isn’t working, the field wire is damaged. If none of the zones in a control valve box is working, the common wire is damaged, although the field wires could also be bad.

To find a bad wire, bypass each in turn by temporarily substituting a 14-gauge wire for the original that you run above ground. Make the wire connections with the controller turned off. Then turn the controller back on. Test the field wire first. If the zone turns on, the old field wire is bad. Replace it with an 18-gauge wire rated for underground burial. Bury the wire at least 8 in. underground. Follow the same procedure to test the common wire.

Sprinkler Content

Replacing Broken Sprinkler Heads

It’s easy to run over a sprinkler head with a lawn mower or set sprinkler water pressure too high, which makes broken sprinkler heads a common source of irrigation frustration. If your sprinkler heads have broken casings, won’t pop up all the way, and/or have inconsistent or nonexistent spray patterns, you may need to replace them.

When looking for replacement sprinkler heads, it is important to match the brand of the sprinkler system you have installed. For instance, Dr. Sprinkler Repair works exclusively with Rain Bird products for installations, so any replacement parts our expert sprinkler technicians purchase will be Rain Bird products as well. Purchasing the same brand as the original parts allows for a seamless transition to a working lawn irrigation system.

Prior to replacing a sprinkler head, be sure to shut off the water sprinkler system. Next, dig a hole (approximately two feet in diameter) around the broken sprinkler head. Make sure to save the dirt in order to fill in the hole later! Be careful not to damage the irrigation sprinkler pipes, as that will require a much bigger fix. Dig down 8 to 12 inches to the base of the sprinkler’s vertical pipe, also known as the “riser,” in order to expose all of the pieces that will be replaced.

Carefully twist the old sprinkler head in a counterclockwise fashion to remove it from the vertical pipe, so that you don’t get soil in the pipe (this could cause a blockage in the water line and potentially damage the new sprinkler head). If the years of use have caused the sprinkler head to become stuck in place, a wrench may be needed to loosen it. Hold the riser in place while using a wrench to avoid tearing the rest of the irrigation pipes out of place.

Install the new sprinkler head by twisting it into place with a clockwise motion (no need for a wrench – hand-tight will be just fine). Set the spray pattern according to the directions that accompanied the purchase of the new sprinkler head, then replace the sod that you removed from the hole previously.

Repairing a Defective Sprinkler Zone

Lawn irrigation systems are organized into several zones, or valves – this acts as a failsafe of sorts for your system. If one sprinkler zone becomes defective, the whole system is not necessarily compromised, which can save you a lot of time and money. Each sprinkler valve has its own electrical valves for the sprinkler heads in that area, so if an individual zone is not working, that is a good place to start looking for the source of the problem.

Check all wiring in the sprinkler zone for stable and secure connections. Next, check to see that the transformer is plugged in and working. Then look at the circuit breaker to be sure that the main panel is on and working. If none of those appear to be malfunctioning, it may be best to test the voltage to the sprinkler zone using a multimeter, a device available at most local hardware stores and home centers. Turn on the broken sprinkler valve from the controller and measure the voltage to see if it falls within your systems recommended range (which can be found in the sprinkler system’s owner’s manual.

If it does not fall within that range, the controller may need to be replaced. If maintained properly, sprinkler controllers do not often break unless they are struck by lightning, but this has been known to happen. New controllers vary in price from about $175 to $400. When looking for a replacement controller, be sure to purchase the exact same model as was previously installed.

20 Jan 2016

How to fix Sprinkler Head

Replacing Broken Sprinkler Heads

It’s easy to run over a sprinkler head with a lawn mower or set sprinkler water pressure too high, which makes broken sprinkler heads a common source of irrigation frustration. If your sprinkler heads have broken casings, won’t pop up all the way, and/or have inconsistent or nonexistent spray patterns, you may need to replace them.

When looking for replacement sprinkler heads, it is important to match the brand of the sprinkler system you have installed. For instance, Dr. Sprinkler Repair works exclusively with Rain Bird products for installations, so any replacement parts our expert sprinkler technicians purchase will be Rain Bird products as well. Purchasing the same brand as the original parts allows for a seamless transition to a working lawn irrigation system.

Irrigation Repair Master sprinkelr utah

Prior to replacing a sprinkler head, be sure to shut off the water sprinkler system. Next, dig a hole (approximately two feet in diameter) around the broken sprinkler head. Make sure to save the dirt in order to fill in the hole later! Be careful not to damage the irrigation sprinkler pipes, as that will require a much bigger fix. Dig down 8 to 12 inches to the base of the sprinkler’s vertical pipe, also known as the “riser,” in order to expose all of the pieces that will be replaced.

Carefully twist the old sprinkler head in a counterclockwise fashion to remove it from the vertical pipe, so that you don’t get soil in the pipe (this could cause a blockage in the water line and potentially damage the new sprinkler head). If the years of use have caused the sprinkler head to become stuck in place, a wrench may be needed to loosen it. Hold the riser in place while using a wrench to avoid tearing the rest of the irrigation pipes out of place.

Master Sprinkler Repair United States ca

Install the new sprinkler head by twisting it into place with a clockwise motion (no need for a wrench – hand-tight will be just fine). Set the spray pattern according to the directions that accompanied the purchase of the new sprinkler head, then replace the sod that you removed from the hole previously.

Repairing a Defective Sprinkler Zone

Lawn irrigation systems are organized into several zones – this acts as a failsafe of sorts for your system. If one zone becomes defective, the whole system is not necessarily compromised, which can save you a lot of time and money. Each zone has its own electrical valves for the sprinkler heads in that area, so if an individual zone is not working, that is a good place to start looking for the source of the problem.

Check all wiring in the zone for stable and secure connections. Next, check to see that the transformer is plugged in and working. Then look at the circuit breaker to be sure that the main panel is on and working. If none of those appear to be malfunctioning, it may be best to test the voltage to the sprinkler zone using a multimeter, a device available at most local hardware stores and home centers.

 

Dr. Sprinkler Repair, Sprinkler repair, yard sprinklers, residential sprinklers, lawn sprinkler, sprinkler repair, sprinkler system repair, lawn sprinkler repair, automatic lawn sprinkler system